Spam Filtering

Windows/Outlook Users

For instructions on setting up spam filtering for your email, click on your version of Microsoft Outlook below.  We've created small movies that will walk you through the necessary steps.

Which version of Outlook do I have?

  • Open Outlook (login to your mail)
  • Go the Help menu, and choose 'About Microsoft Outlook'

Note that at the bottom middle of the movie, you'll see the following toolbar:

Captivate Movie Toolbar

Use the buttons to rewind, fast-forward, play, pause and exit the movie.

MAC/Entourage Users

  • Open Entourage.
  • Make sure your Folder List is visible.
    If it is not on the screen, click on the View menu and select Folder Lists.
  • Create a mail folder called 'Junk Mail'.
    • Click on 'Inbod' so that it is hightlight.
    • Go to the File menu at the top of the window, select 'New' and then 'Folder'.
    • A new folder will appear in your folder list. Type: Junk Mail
    • Press Enter
  • Go to the Tools menu and select Rules.
  • Make sure that the Mail (POP) tab is selected.
  • Click on the New button.
  • For Rule Name, type: Junk Mail
  • The first pull down menu entitled 'Execute' should be set to "if all criteria are met".
  • In the next pull down menu, select Specific header.
  • In the box next to it, type: X-UBC-Warning
  • The next pull down menu should be set to Contains.
  • In the box to the right of that, type: [SPAM]
  • In the section below, select 'Move message' from the first pull down menu.
  • In the pull down menu next to it, select the 'Junk Mail' folder that you just created.
  • There might be a second row in the lower section with Set Category in the first pull down menu. If there is, highlight this row and click on the Remove Action button.
  • Make sure that Enabled is checked.
  • Click OK.
  • Make sure that there is a checkmark next to the listed rule called Junk Mail.
  • Close the Rules window.

Screenshot - Entourage

to top

Last reviewed2/11/2011 5:06:18 PM


a place of mind, The University of British Columbia