Lindsay Richter

Lindsay Richter

The potential is yours.

When dealing with our world’s most difficult problems, there are two choices: Either giving up and admitting defeat, or believing in our potential to shape a different future. That choice is at the heart of UBC’s latest national advertising campaign, called ‘The potential is yours.

Meet Lindsay Richter, MSc student in Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, who is featured in the campaign.


Q
What drew you to your field of study?

A: I’ve always been curious and intrigued by medical research. I found my path to the fields of neonatology and obstetrics with the guidance of incredible mentors, along with my passion from volunteering in the community with new mothers and their newborns. In particular, I am very interested in neonatal and maternal health research in prematurity as well as neonatal outcomes following spontaneous and clinician-initiated preterm birth.

I am interested in the short-term and long-term health outcomes of infants born during the opioid crisis and their mothers, and I am eager to explore innovative solutions to tackle and overcome these problems.

— Lindsay Richter
Q
Is there a specific area of research that has caught your attention?

A: With the growing opioid overdose crisis, the pattern of drug dependence has shifted to more socioeconomically and demographically diverse populations, including pregnant women. Opioid use during pregnancy can have negative effects on the fetus in-utero as well as the neonate after birth. Not only that, but maternal health outcomes are understudied in women with drug dependency. Healthy mothers are essential to healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. With my additional training as a paramedic, this area of research has recently sparked my interest and merits collaborative and dedicated efforts to address the issue and ensure both neonatal and maternal well-being.

Q
What are some problems you’d like to tackle, or to try and help solve?

A: Opioid use during pregnancy can lead to harmful outcomes such as preterm birth, slow fetal growth and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). NAS is a drug withdrawal syndrome that opioid-exposed infants experience after birth. It affects critical areas of neonatal adaptation including sleeping, feeding and autonomous function. I am interested in the short-term and long-term health outcomes of infants born during the opioid crisis and their mothers, and I am eager to explore innovative solutions to tackle and overcome these problems.

Q
How does UBC support you in realizing your greatest potential?

A: The University of British Columbia has supported me in realizing my greatest potential through the excellent mentorship that I have been fortunate enough to receive. I am so grateful for the outstanding support from my supervisors and the UBC faculty while pursuing my graduate degree. With the high calibre of health research at UBC, I have been able to enrich my academic training, empower myself with knowledge and realize my potential to make an important impact in healthcare and medicine.

See Lindsay Richter in the campaign

‘The potential is yours’ campaign highlights the importance of UBC’s research and teaching mission, and demonstrates how the university is helping to address society’s largest challenges.